06 April 2020 13:06

APAC

Mindshare Reveals Asian Consumers Positive about the Prospect of a Connected Future

Chinese and Indian Consumers Twice as Excited about the Internet of Things than the Global Average, but Data Use is Still a Concern

Asia Pacific – Consumers in APAC are more likely to be interested in the idea of digital connectivity and Internet of Things than the global average, according to new research from Mindshare, the media agency network that is part of WPP.

The research, carried out by Mindshare across 19 markets and 11,000 respondents using its proprietary Mindreader survey, looks at people’s attitudes towards connected devices and products in the home and the services they could perform such as automatic reordering of products, notifying about best usage times (such as in cold weather) or notifications of expiry dates (for perishable food).

Consumers are most excited about the prospect of the connected home and car as an obvious extension of their current digital lives, with home security (84%) and TVs (82%) being the most popular choices, followed by music systems (74%), heating / aircon (70%), cars (69%), door locks (65%), washing machine (60%), and refrigerators (59%). In many cases, consumers in markets such as India and China were around twice as interested as the global average.

When it comes to consumables, APAC respondents were warm to the idea of connected food (40%), drinks (38%), clothes (36%), shoes (35%), health and beauty products (34%), laundry products (34%), cleaning products (33%), toilets (30%) and mirrors (27%).

Among the Asian countries surveyed, China, India and Malaysia are leading the “connected” charge. Consumers in Japan and Australia however are more skeptical towards connected products and more in line with the rest of the world.

The study also looks at the barriers to entry for these connected products and devices, including the sharing of data. Globally, sixty per cent of people are ‘concerned’ about companies knowing how, when and how often they use their products. The concern rises to 63% in South Korea, 67% in China, 75% in Malaysia and 86% in India.

Of the devices / products that can be connected, mobile phones (60%) cause the most concern over their sharing of data globally, followed by TVs (48%), alcohol (45%), fresh fruit and vegetables (45%), everyday food (45%) and ready meals (45%).

Globally, the biggest reason stated for concern is that ‘privacy is an important principle to me’ (61%), followed by ‘they will use the data to sell me more stuff’ (48%) and ‘hackers could access the information’ (43%). But only 20% of Chinese consumers said that they wouldn't share data with companies because they “find it creepy” compared with the 38% global average.

Amy Kean, Regional Director of Strategy, Mindshare Asia Pacific said: "Digital technology has excited the world for decades, but it seems there is no other region more passionate about a connected future than APAC. For many Asian consumers, the internet isn't a separate 'thing', it's just an always-on mobile-driven extension of their lives and so the idea of connected homes, cars and security systems is simple evolution: a no-brainer. However, IoT companies still have some work to do to convince consumers across China, India and Japan to part with their data – not necessarily because of privacy concerns but rather because users of yet to see the true value of digitally-driven life technologies."

The quantitative global study accompanies a qualitative study carried out by Mindshare UK and Mindshare’s dedicated global wearables unit Life+, which looks into the usage of connected products and devices in the home.

Key findings of the study include:

· Consumers do not want the additional burden of curating the various and ever-increasing interaction types. Instead there will be a need for a central aggregator to manage the IoT in the home. This may take the form of a personal assistant (Siri, Echo, Cortana), or perhaps an application provided by a retailer.

· The infrastructure
needs to be established
for integration of connectivity within packaging, and simple, affordable means of scanning and managing the information and data created. There will likely be significant reward for the brands that make the first successful moves within
this space.

Read 1388 times Last modified on Tuesday, 29 March 2016 09:05
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