02 February 2023 03:19

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Did you see the report of the most luxurious cities in the world in 2022? The luxury lifestyle is always in search of the top expensive luxury city in the world. Today, I will show you the full details of the expensive cities in the world.

This thing happened for the first time in 30 years of history. Paris, Hong Kong, Singapore got a first place together as the topmost expensive & luxurious cities in the world. Mostly, luxurious people like to live in these cities.

This list of most luxury cities in the world 2022 will make you surprised to see the price of their high-end living costs. This list included living costs, food costs, clothing costs, transport costs, monthly costs, family costs, etc. You may check our recent publication on Dubai Luxury Lifestyle.

The Economist Intelligence unit researches every year to find out the top most luxury cities in the world. This list is the most updated list that can be frequently updated day after day.

Let’s see the top list of most luxurious cities to live in the world in 2022

01. Dubai, UAE

Living Cost: $4,000 – $8,000 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $900 – $1,600 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $130 – $200 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $600 – $1,000 (Per Month, 01 Person)

02. Los Angeles, USA

Living Cost: $3,500 – $7,000 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $800 – $1,200 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $100 – $160 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $400 – $800 (Per Month, 01 Person)

03. Paris, France

Living Cost: $3,000 – $6,000 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $600 – $1,200 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $70 – $150 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $300 – $700 (Per Month, 01 Person)

04. Hong Kong, China

Living Cost: $4,500 – $6,000 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $800 – $1,400 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $50 – $100 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $200 – $500 (Per Month, 01 Person)

05. Singapore

Living Cost: $1,500 – $4,000 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $600 – $1,100 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $60 – $110 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $300 – $800 (Per Month, 01 Person)

06. Sydney, Australia

Living Cost: $2,500 – $4,000 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $700 – $800 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $70 – $130 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $400 – $700 (Per Month, 01 Person)

07. New York, USA

Living Cost: $1,500 – $4,000 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $400 – $900 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $50 – $100 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $300 – $600 (Per Month, 01 Person)

08. Tokyo, Japan

Living Cost: $2,000 – $5,000 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $700 – $1,200 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $50 – $110 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $300 – $600 (Per Month, 01 Person)

09. Geneva, Switzerland

Living Cost: $3,000 – $6,000 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $700 – $1,200 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $120 – $180 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $400 – $900 (Per Month, 01 Person)

10. Zurich, Switzerland

Living Cost: $3,000 – $5,700 (Per Month, Family)
Food Cost: $1,000 – $1,500 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Clothing Cost: $100 – $125 (Per Month, 01 Person)
Transport & Vehicles: $750 – $1000 (Per Month, 01 Person)

Source- PassionBuz.com

Given the video gaming industry’s close ties with sports thanks to the popularity of sports video games, it is worth exploring how interested gamers are in the real thing.

Gamers in this piece are defined as those who play video games on their PC or console for at least an hour each week. We will use various metrics from YouGov BrandIndex to explore the attitudes of gamers towards the FIFA World Cup in four distinct markets – USA, UK, UAE, and China.

Across three out of our four markets, gamers have been paying more attention to the FIFA World Cup, in the form of hearing things (both positive or negative) about the event from friends, family, the media or advertising.

Three-tenths of UK’s gamers say they have heard about the event in the past two weeks (29%), compared to a quarter of all UK adults (24%). In the States, nearly a fifth of gamers say they have heard about the World Cup (18%) as opposed to only 12% of the overall population.

In the UAE, nearly three-fifths of gamers have heard about the event in the past two weeks (59%), putting them only three percentage points ahead of the overall population in this regard (56%). With regards to the much higher rates in the UAE compared to other markets, it is worth remembering that this is the first FIFA World Cup in the middle east region, which is almost certainly resulting in more conversations about it.

China is the only market where gamers are less likely to have heard about the World Cup than the overall population (21% vs 23%).

While gamers are more likely to have heard about the World Cup in most markets than the regular population, what they are hearing isn’t necessarily positive. YouGov’s Buzz metric is a net measure based on responses to two questions: “Over the past two weeks, which of the following sports events have you heard something positive about?” and “Now which of the following sports events have you heard something negative about?”. By calculating the difference between these two scores, we create our Buzz metric.

In UK, higher attention scores aren’t translating into positivity about the event. Buzz scores among gamers sit at -8.8 (vs -5.9 in the overall population). In China, the tournament records a positive score and there isn’t much difference between the experience of gamers (9.9) and the overall population (10.6), as is the case in UAE (49.6 vs 48.9). Only in the US, do gamers maintain a strong lead in Buzz scores (11 vs 5.3).

The perceptions of the Value of the event follow a similar pattern, wherein scores among UK gamers are much lower than the overall population (-11.5 among gamers vs -6.5 among all adults), while gamers lead the overall population in Value scores in the US (9.1 vs 6.2) and UAE (52.7 vs 49.3). The Value metric is a net score of the percentage of those who feel a sports event represents good value for money for those paying to see it (whether in person or on TV) minus the share of those who feel it represents poor value for money.

While there’s a negative Buzz about the World Cup among UK gamers, it hasn’t impacted gamers’ appetite to watch or follow the tournament. YouGov’s SportsIndex Satisfaction score presents the net difference between the share of consumers who say they would give up time to follow an event as they take place and the share of those who say they are unlikely to give up time to follow an event.

Among UK gamers, this score is 18.9 points, markedly higher than the 14.2 among all UK adults. The Satisfaction score in the US and UAE is higher among gamers than the overall population in those markets, but the reverse is true in China.

 

 BBC News continues to be the #1 online news brand in India

• BBC News digital continues to be the #1 international news brand on mobile

• BBC World News also continues to hold the #1 position among the international news channels

The latest results from the IPSOS Affluent Survey have revealed that BBC News continues to be the number one online news brand consumed daily in India. 4 BBC News digital also continues to top the chart as the number one international news brand accessed on mobile in India.

Notably, the results indicate that BBC News is the number one news brand accessed online daily in the category of national and international news brands not only by Business Decision Makers7 but also by:

- Prospective Car Buyers
- Investors
- Sustainability Minded Consumers
- Premium Hotel/Resorts Users
- Frequent Travellers (national and international)
- IT Purchase Influencers

The survey further announced that BBC World News continues to hold the number one position among the international television news channels with India’s affluent audiences in the category of:

- C-suites
- Top Management
- In-charge of department
- Automobile Enthusiasts
- Interested in Sports
- Travellers

Vishal Bhatnagar, Director of Sales, South Asia, News, for BBC Studios says: “Its delightful to see our world class journalism continuing to reach affluent audiences in the crowded media landscape of India. This truly is a result of our commitment to analysing and examining the complex news and business stories which provide valuable information with which businesses can make informed decisions.”

BBC News also continues to be the number one international online news brand in APAC1 and tops the chart among Business Decision Makers2 and Top Management3 with BBC News as the number one international online news brand in APAC.

Source (Audience/Sample): Ipsos Affluent Survey APAC H2 2022;

[1] APAC (45592844/20113), news brands accessed via online daily

[2] APAC; Business Decision Makers (9695392/8481), news brands accessed via online daily

[3] APAC; Top Management (2627241/5426), news brands accessed via online daily

[4] India (4131752/2568), news brands accessed via online daily, Brands considered- Al Jazeera English, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Quint, CNBC TV18, CNN, CNN News18, Euronews, Financial Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, NDTV(24x7), Reuters, The Economist, The NYT, The Times of India, The WSJ, The Washington Post, Times Now, Business Insider India, Moneycontrol.com, BBC News, Republic TV

[5] India (4131752/2568), news brands accessed via mobile in the PAST 30 DAYS

[6] India (4131752/2568), news channels watched in the PAST 30 DAYS

[7] India; All BDMs(1112607/1034), news brands accessed via online daily, Brands considered- Al Jazeera English, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Quint, CNBC TV18, CNN, CNN News18, Euronews, Financial Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, NDTV(24x7), Reuters, The Economist, The NYT, The Times of India, The WSJ, The Washington Post, Times Now, Business Insider India, Moneycontrol.com, BBC News, Republic TV

[8] India; Prospect Car buyers (2226009/1435), news brands accessed via online daily, Brands considered- Al Jazeera English, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Quint, CNBC TV18, CNN, CNN News18, Euronews, Financial Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, NDTV(24x7), Reuters, The Economist, The NYT, The Times of India, The WSJ, The Washington Post, Times Now, Business Insider India, Moneycontrol.com, BBC News, Republic TV

[9] India; Investors (3676569/2349), news brands accessed via online daily, Brands considered- Al Jazeera English, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Quint, CNBC TV18, CNN, CNN News18, Euronews, Financial Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, NDTV(24x7), Reuters, The Economist, The NYT, The Times of India, The WSJ, The Washington Post, Times Now, Business Insider India, Moneycontrol.com, BBC News, Republic TV

[10] India; Sustainability minded consumers (1104261/699), news brands accessed via online daily, Brands considered- Al Jazeera English, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Quint, CNBC TV18, CNN, CNN News18, Euronews, Financial Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, NDTV(24x7), Reuters, The Economist, The NYT, The Times of India, The WSJ, The Washington Post, Times Now, Business Insider India, Moneycontrol.com, BBC News, Republic TV

[11] India, Premium hotels/resorts user (2022467/1494), news brands accessed via online daily, Brands considered- Al Jazeera English, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Quint, CNBC TV18, CNN, CNN News18, Euronews, Financial Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, NDTV(24x7), Reuters, The Economist, The NYT, The Times of India, The WSJ, The Washington Post, Times Now, Business Insider India, Moneycontrol.com, BBC News, Republic TV

[12] India, Frequent International travelers (1867925/1386), news brands accessed via online daily, Brands considered- Al Jazeera English, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Quint, CNBC TV18, CNN, CNN News18, Euronews, Financial Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, NDTV(24x7), Reuters, The Economist, The NYT, The Times of India, The WSJ, The Washington Post, Times Now, Business Insider India, Moneycontrol.com, BBC News, Republic TV

India,Frequent domestic travelers (1842683/1230), news brands accessed via online daily, Brands considered- Al Jazeera English, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Quint, CNBC TV18, CNN, CNN News18, Euronews, Financial Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, NDTV(24x7), Reuters, The Economist, The NYT, The Times of India, The WSJ, The Washington Post, Times Now, Business Insider India, Moneycontrol.com, BBC News, Republic TV

[13] India,IT Purchase influencers (1354810/1140), news brands accessed via online daily, Brands considered- Al Jazeera English, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Quint, CNBC TV18, CNN, CNN News18, Euronews, Financial Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, NDTV(24x7), Reuters, The Economist, The NYT, The Times of India, The WSJ, The Washington Post, Times Now, Business Insider India, Moneycontrol.com, BBC News, Republic TV

[14] India; C-suites (87968/124), news channels watched in the PAST 30 DAYS

[15] India,Top Management(237434/628), news channels watched in the PAST 30 DAYS

[16] India, Incharge of department (553124/257), news channels watched in the PAST 30 DAYS

[17] India, Automobile enthusiasts (869597/513), news channels watched in the PAST 30 DAYS

[18] India, Interested in sports (1363847/833), news channels watched in the PAST 30 DAYS

[19] India, Travellers (1392131/772), news channels watched in the PAST 30 DAYS

 

Wednesday, 16 November 2022 00:00

Unique trends in Indian Media Landscape

Whenever a new, pathbreaking medium comes into play ,it goes without saying, the entire media landscape changes. Think of the entry of Print , Radio , Films , Television , etc and the enormous impact they all had when they came into existence. But ever since the advent of the mobile phone and the Internet in the 2000’s and the consequent digital and communication revolution, our lives have changed irreversibly . Now if you add the recent impact of the Covid pandemic to this phenomenon, the digital revolution is on the fast lane with digital media consumption hitting a new peak . Some of these consumption changes are here to stay and some aren’t . In the post-covid era , despite the continuing growth story of digital media , traditional media is thankfully bouncing back after a temporary dip in India

Trends in media space unique to India

While this trend of comeback by traditional media is happening globally what is unique to our country is that each of the key traditional media platforms viz. TV , Print , Radio & OOH are expected to show positive growth individually over the next five year period even as digital media keeps growing rapidly led by deeper internet and mobile penetration .

This is just not the case elsewhere in the world and does indicate that digital and traditional media seem to be not only co-existing but are also complementing each other in growth here . May be there is so much market potential in an emerging economic superpower like India that there is space for all media to thrive but , of course , in varying proportions . In other words , traditional media may witness steady growth at best or even low growth (eg. Print media which isn’t growing in most parts of the world) while digital grows by leaps and bounds . Next question that hits our mind is if this unique trend is something to cheer about ?

Balancing act can be beneficial

Whether this balancing act between digital and traditional media that is happening in India can potentially bring some socio-economic benefits along with it is the moot question worth analysing . To appreciate the case for continued growth for traditional media , one may have to look closely at some of the prevailing controversies surrounding digital or social media :

Wide prevalence of fake or unfiltered news on digital platforms is a matter of grave concern in a world which is being increasingly dominated by digital media . And the most unfortunate thing is that during the once-in-a-century kind of crisis created by covid pandemic where there were no instant solutions on offer it was critical that only regulated, scientific and authentic info is passed to the anxious public , but then digital or social media proved to be a mixed bag with all kinds of unverified info being communicated directly to the common man . People had to rely on traditional media like Radio ,Print ,TV ,etc to get more filtered and dependable info bereft of speculation and no wonder , some media research surveys done during this period indicated that Radio and Print were ranked high on credibility with social media was lagging well behind .

We all by now know about the controversy involving the world’s richest man stalling his takeover of Twitter on the grounds of suspected bot accounts . While there is a debate on the percentage of fake accounts , there seems to be no flat denial about its very existence on this particular platform or a few other digital platforms which is of concern to both end users and advertisers

Last but not the least , the on going debate on data privacy and digital surveillance . Intimate personal data captured through innocent looking cookies in browsers and websites and also thro various apps that we use everyday is arguably the biggest threat to privacy that mankind is facing at this point in time in spite of the unquestionable benefits of using social media . At present, 80% of the advertisers are said to be using cookies for ad targeting and customisation . While some effective measures like deprecation of third party cookies by Google , etc and removal of IDFA access by Apple ios are already being considered or being partially executed, the fact remains that our personal data will be key to monetization of digital media and one needs to be cautious about sharing it always . From the advertiser’s point of view , other than concerns on new restrictions due to privacy protection affecting reach , customisation and accurate targeting without media wastage, there a few other crucial points to ponder which are related to certain ‘x’ factors like emotional connect , lasting loyalty , etc which are most critical for brand building .

Given the concerns shared above , one can safely suggest that marketing objectives of brands can be more comprehensively achieved by striking the right balance between traditional and digital media instead of putting all the eggs in one basket . This way one can get the best of both worlds as the traditional media can help target a wider audience and establish an emotional connect with better brand loyalty and the digital media can be used to focus on specific segments and to measure the output of a campaign more accurately .

Over and above the points discussed above , thinking straight from the heart and as an end user devoid of bias, we all know that each and every major media option whether it is TV , Digital ,Radio , Print and OOH has its own, alluring charm and yours sincerely for one would not want to give up on any of these options going forward . Thankfully, the unique trend being predicted in the Indian media landscape of co-existence and thriving of both traditional and digital media at least in the immediate future should definitely be music to all our ears !

 

Written by B Surendar,COO & Director,Red FM network

WPP today publishes The Consumer Equality Equation, the most comprehensive study into the relationship between ethnicity, the consumer experience in the UK and potential business growth opportunities.

Supported by WPP’s Racial Equity Programme – which funds inclusion projects that advance racial justice across the world – the report reveals ways in which businesses can address what matters most to these consumer groups to both unlock commercial opportunities and create positive societal impact.

Demographics in the UK are changing: the number of people from Minority Ethnic groups will double to almost a third of the UK adult population by 2061, while their estimated annual disposable income will rise to £575 billion, more than double what it is today. Despite their collective spending power, the limited amount of data and insight previously available for brands into these consumer groups has resulted in unequal consumer experiences.

Brands stand to miss out on a cumulative disposable income of up to £727 billion by the end of 2023, £3.06 trillion by 2031 and £16.7 trillion by 2061, unless they invest in ways to connect meaningfully with these consumers.

Actions that brands can take now will generate loyalty that can last generations. Faced with a cost-of-living crisis and an increasingly crowded marketplace, brands who better understand the diverse needs of their consumers can engage new customers, differentiate themselves as people demand more from their products and services, and futureproof their business. By engaging just 1% of people from Minority Ethnic groups to change their spending habits across seven sectors, brands could tap into a £2.34bn short-term growth opportunity by 2023, £12.3bn over the next decade (to 2031), or a potential £107bn over a lifetime (to 2061).

Mark Read, CEO of WPP, said: “We know that brands who invest come out stronger in times of economic uncertainty. As people look to prioritise their expenditure and change their habits, businesses need to rethink any previous assumptions about Minority Ethnic spending. The consumer experience – good or bad – directly shapes and influences people’s daily lives, meaning business leaders play a pivotal role in helping to build a more equal and thriving society.”

Karen Blackett OBE, President of WPP in the UK, said: “Missed or seemingly small consumer opportunities all add up. Engaging just 1% of Minority Ethnic groups now will have an immediate effect for brands which multiplies over time to bring medium and long-term commercial growth. By taking time to understand the varied and nuanced consumer experiences of people from different ethnic groups, brands have the opportunity to make a positive and lasting impact both on society and their bottom line.”

The report features data from 8,300+ participants from six ethnic groups: Black (2,000+), East and South East Asian (700+), Middle Eastern (600+), Mixed Ethnicity (1,000+), South Asian (2,000+), and White (2,000+). The study was a two year-long collaboration between WPP, GroupM and Ogilvy Consulting with original research from Kantar, BAV and Choreograph. It explores in detail different aspects and categories that make up a person’s consumer experience: health, employment, finance, retail, clothing and fashion, beauty and personal care, food and beverage, luxury, and the high street.

Shelina Janmohamed, VP of Islamic Marketing at Ogilvy Consulting, and lead author of The Consumer Equality Equation, said: “We set out to ask a simple but infrequently asked question that is fundamental to future brand success: what does it mean to stand in the shoes of Minority Ethnic consumers? Our research has helped us create a transformative framework for our clients and their customers that addresses systemic consumer inequality and leads to business growth through holistic engagement. This relationship – ‘The Consumer Equality Equation’ – is an important and game-changing milestone in laying the groundwork for tangible change in everyone’s consumer experiences.”

The report’s insights include:

Brands have an important role to play in society and all consumers’ lives, irrespective of ethnicity:

82% of all respondents say that brands play an important role in shaping Britain’s culture.
80% of all respondents agree brands have a responsibility to reflect modern Britain.
70% of all respondents believe that the actions, products and services of brands can affect their wellbeing.
83% of all respondents believe brands should make more of an effort in understanding different ethnic groups.

People want their brands to step up and be part of the conversation:

77% of people from Minority Ethnic groups say that they actively choose to buy brands that have a strong social purpose and try to do good, compared to 56% of White respondents.
73% of respondents from Black and Mixed Ethnic groups thought that “brands should be in conversations about climate change and sustainability” compared to 63% of White respondents.

Diversifying the consumer experience and leaning into the needs of some groups doesn’t mean alienating others:

Out-of-Home is a trusted broadcast medium across people from all Minority Ethnic groups due to its community-oriented and based nature which can achieve personalisation for different groups through strategic planning of both location and creative messaging.

Every Minority Ethnic group considers Fenty as the most ‘courageous’ brand, while White respondents also ranked it highly in second place.

Brands need to challenge any previous assumptions:

More than 5 in 6 people from Minority Ethnic groups purchase luxury goods compared to less than 4 in 6 of White respondents.
The business opportunity of consumers from Minority Ethnic groups within beauty and personal care is expected to rise to £10.5 billion annually by 2061.
28% of people from Minority Ethnic groups aged 18-54 say they were investing money to increase their wealth, compared to 17% of the same age group of White people.

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